Photos of Eggs Cooked Many Ways

Editor’s note: A previous version of this post referred to the dishes in all of these photos as ‘omelettes’ for the sake of brevity and broad categorization. I apologize for any offense I may have caused. The article has been edited to reflect diversity of technique and linguistic variation of these dishes.

About a year ago I bought a $3 non-stick skillet and started cooking eggs. LOTS of eggs. I’m not really sure why, but I’ve continued the practice. French omelette. Okonomiyaki, the Japanese pancake. The old egg foo young. Spanish tortilla de papas. Bosnian omelette. Oh, eggs! They’re cheap, easy, delicious and filling. I’ve decided to document every egg-in-a-pan dish I prepare from this day forward. Continue reading “Photos of Eggs Cooked Many Ways”

Tell Gwyneth Paltrow Her Corn Vichysoisse Belongs On Her Face As A Rejuvenating Mask. Okroshka Is The Chilled Vegetable Soup For Me.

Every article about chilled soups begins thus: The hot, gungy, sticky, filthy, smelly summer is not the time for rich, braised meat or thick, creamy chowder. No, no. No. Summer is the season for light, cool foods, if you didn’t know, and chilled soups are the perfect nutrient delivery system during the disgusting middle months.

Not all chilled soups are created equal, though. As the old nursery rhyme goes:

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Kvas: The Original Slavic Soda Pop

I was very fortunate to study Russian language at St. Louis University High School for the first two years of my high school career. To compound the blessing, my teacher was Mr. Gregory Morris, who spoke beautiful Muscovite Russian and taught us as much about the culture as he did the language. Continue reading “Kvas: The Original Slavic Soda Pop”

Gyulaí Kolbasz: Smoked Hungarian Sausage

We don’t have a large Hungarian population in St. Louis, so the really good homemade-quality sausages are somewhat out of reach. We do, however, have access to some commercially produced Hungarian charcuterie at international supermarkets. Jay International on South Grand and Global Foods in Kirkwood come to mind. I picked up this one-pound package of Bende Gyulaí Kolbasz at Jay International for about $5. Continue reading “Gyulaí Kolbasz: Smoked Hungarian Sausage”

Imperial Roast Pork: Even Better Than It Sounds

I was living in Zagreb, in an old working class neighborhood called Kustošija on the west side of town.  My apartment was a good 15-minute walk from the transit hub in Črnomerec, where you can hop a tram or bus to just about anywhere in the city. Continue reading “Imperial Roast Pork: Even Better Than It Sounds”